10 Stories From September 11 You Must Read

10 Stories From September 11 You Must Read

[nextpage title=”Next Page” ]September 11, 2001, is the day New Yorkers showed their true colors. It was a day when the entire New York City Police Force was occupied with the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center Towers at the southern tip of Manhattan Island. New Yorkers had free rein to do whatever crime they wanted to do. Instead, they chose to step up. With genuine sincerity, the people in New York turned a day that was wracked with evil into a melting pot overflowing with human kindness. Here are several stories from that fateful day, the day that changed America and brought her citizens closer together than ever before.[/nextpage]
[nextpage title=”Next Page” ]

1. Curiosity

Image source: framework.latimes.com

At 8:46 a.m., Flight 11 crashes into the North Tower of the World Trade Center. People saw the plane hit, but few suspected it was anything more than an unlikely accident.

2. Bewilderment

Image source: www.activistpost.com

There were conflicting reports about the size of the plane. The nation was left wondering how a plane could fly into one of the Twin Towers. Seventeen minutes later, everybody realized the truth.
[/nextpage]
[nextpage title=”Next Page” ]

3. Rage

Image source: www.nydailynews.com

At 9:03 a.m., Flight 175 slammed into the South Tower, killing hundreds of people and shocking a nation of onlookers to the reality that New York was under terroristic attack.

4. Helplessness

Image source: undicisettembre.blogspot.com

For the first time in history, the FAA grounds all flights in or inbound to the United States. Millions of viewers take to the streets and to TVs around the nation and the world…and just watch.
[/nextpage]
[nextpage title=”Next Page” ]

5. Admiration

Image source: www.cleveland.com

The NYFD take the stairs. Thinking only of others and suppressing their own misgivings, firefighters climb many, many flights to help people. 343 firefighters perished that day. Plus 23 police officers, 37 Port Authority police officers, and two paramedics…all died helping others. Pictured here is New York firefighter, Mike Kehoe, who thankfully survived.

6. Fear

Image source: www.zenaa.com

After the first plane hit the North Tower, people began descending the South Tower stairs, too. Around the 18th floor, wary workers got a boost from a security guard on a megaphone singing God Bless America. He encouraged everyone to keep moving, saying it was a historic day and they were going to make it.

[/nextpage]
[nextpage title=”Next Page” ]

7. Uncertainty

Image source: www.theatlantic.com

Ed Beyea worked on the 27th floor of Tower 1. Ed was quadriplegic and in a wheelchair. As his coworkers fled among fear and screaming, Ed was left alone…except for Avremel Zelmanowitz who promised to stay by his side until Captain William Burke of the NYFD arrived to carry Ed down. The three never made it out, but their story did, thanks to Avremel’s phone call to his wife.

8. Paralysis

Image source: www.abc.net.au

Citizens stop their lives to stare as the Towers burn. Their disbelief will soon turn to panic and horror as they, themselves, move from   spectators to participants as the South Tower falls.
[/nextpage]
[nextpage title=”Next Page” ]

9. Horror

Image source: www.dailymail.co.uk

The South Tower begins to crumble. It leaves a tower of smoke in its place and sends a wave of thick dust that blankets lower Manhattan.

10. Confusion

Image source: www.rsvlts.com

The blinding, suffocating dust that spread like an obscene tsunami covered and coated everything in its path with ash and dirt.

[/nextpage]
[nextpage title=”Next Page” ]

11. Shock

Image source: www.theatlantic.com

The cloud was so thick, it was not immediately obvious that one tower was no longer there. Newscasters watching from their studio speculated it was another attack, unable to see that the South Tower was…gone.

12. Terror

Image source: forums.superherohype.com

Those closer to the scene turned and ran for their lives. Many tried to outrun the cloud while others, out of disgust or resentment, did not give way, preferring to stand their ground, fighting back in their own way. Some others were compassionately pulled into nearby storefronts by strangers and watched the world go dark outside the windows as the cloud of dust passed.

[/nextpage]

[nextpage title=”Next Page” ]

13. Lost

Image source: www.theatlantic.com

Penelope Trunk ran but was enveloped by the dust. Unable to see, she stumbled on people on the ground and lost her shoes in the pile up. Later, when she started her beleaguered, barefoot, five-mile journey to the Upper West Side, and covered in dust, a stranger bought her a new pair of shoes.

14. Stranded

Image source: www.eyeopeninginfo.com

Cabs offered free rides. Some drivers waived fares, sacrificing their $200-$250 regular day income. They also passed on the opportunity to gauge prices for rides away from the war zone of the Financial District.
[/nextpage]
[nextpage title=”Next Page” ]

15. Dismayed

Image source: www.huffingtonpost.com

Water was priceless, both to clean off the suffocating dust and also to hydrate. Workers in a deli left their restaurant to hand out free bottles to the thirsty throngs on their northward march. At $2.00 a pop, it’s not a lot of money, but they gave away a bunch of bottles. Priceless.

16. Trapped

Image source: www.washingtonpost.com

When the buildings came down and everybody ran, those who ran south were trapped by water. Besides breathing the dust and smoke—and suppressing the horror of the previous hour—was the anxiety of thinking another attack might be imminent.
[/nextpage]
[nextpage title=”Next Page” ]

17. Hopeful

Image source: www.rural-revolution.com

The Coast Guard’s New York Pilot boat put out a call for volunteers to help evacuate lower Manhattan. Within minutes, an astounding number of ferries, private boats, party boats, and tug boats converged near Governor’s Island.

18. Inspired

Image source: drc.udel.edu

The boats began shuttling 500,000 people across the river. It took nine hours and became the largest sea evacuation in history. Some captains even spray painted their boats with the name of their destination on the other side of the river.
[/nextpage]

Leave a Reply