13 Brain Hacks To Fight Fatigue And Give You More Energy

13 Brain Hacks To Fight Fatigue And Give You More Energy

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If you have trouble making it through the day without wanting to go to sleep, you are not alone. However, your problem may be solved. Check out this list of 13 ways to get more energy and recharge your brain during the afternoon doldrums, and find one or two that works for you.

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1. Sleep At Night

Image source: www.holisticvanity.ca

This is the most important (and time consuming) change you can make in your daily, ahem, nightly, routine that will sharpen your sword (your brain) and keep you energized longer throughout the day. It begins with getting to bed and turning out the lights at a similar time each night. When you sleep, your body and brain undergo important processes, like repair and recovery. There are four levels to a sleep cycle, and level 4, REM (Rapid Eye Movement) is the final and the most important for cognitive function: learning, concentrating and higher-level thinking. It takes 70-90 minutes after falling asleep to reach REM, and then that part of the sleep cycle lasts 90-110 minutes. Ideally, we’ll experience four sleep cycles a night, lasting about 90 minutes. Conservatively, that’s 6 hours once you fall asleep. Experts recommend adults get 7-9 hours a night. (Poll: How many hours a night do you get? Type your answer below.)

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9. Listen To This Music

headphones
Image source: qz.com

This hack seems to be individual- or personality-based, yet it could be the easiest item on our list of ways to kick start your brain in the middle of the day (or morning or whenever you need your brain to be effective). Listen to music! But there’s a catch. Hang on for a moment. Music affects the entire brain, stimulating all sections, so said a PET scan in a study that showed music lit up the whole brain. When you listen to music, your brain releases dopamine, the neurotransmitter associated with “feeling-good.” But this feel-good feeling doesn’t always lead to improved concentration and better cognitive output. A study showed that students who listened to their preferred genre while performing a cognitive task did poorer than those who listened to classical music. Of course, the group of students that did not listen to any music did best of all. Bottom line: give Mozart or Bach a try and see if you are in concert.

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